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It would be great for Aviation.SE to develop comprehensive study guides for the oral portions of the practical tests for PPL, CPL, IR, and so on — particularly for some of the tricky or at least less obvious questions that may come up. I’m thinking of a new tag, say [oral-exam-questions], to be paired with [ppl], [cpl], or other appropriate certificate levels.

Would such a series of questions be on topic?

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  • $\begingroup$ I think some comments in my answer to another question might apply here too: SE isn't about pre-selected and curated information. Your proposal also sounds very US-centric to me. $\endgroup$ – Pondlife Dec 5 '15 at 23:30
  • $\begingroup$ So make it three tags: [oral-exam-questions], [ppl], and [faa]. $\endgroup$ – Greg Bacon Dec 5 '15 at 23:54
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A study guide in the form of lists of questions that may appear is bad form for SE, but asking individual questions should be fine. I wouldn't spam the whole ASA study guide, but rather stick to difficult to understand questions. One example of such a question already on the site is What do the terms 'holding out' and 'common carriage' mean? This has implications well beyond the practical test, but is certainly something you'd expect to talk about in a commercial oral.

I would argue against a tag like "oral-exam-questions" as that would be considered a meta-tag that doesn't really stand on its own.

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  • $\begingroup$ That's the idea: a series of questions in that tag where each question is one that an applicant might expect, and all together the questions across that tag comprise a study guide. $\endgroup$ – Greg Bacon Dec 5 '15 at 21:32
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I'm not sure that a comprehensive study guide is really a good fit for any SE site. It certainly wouldn't fit in a question, and the blog doesn't really fit either.

Alternatively, a group of questions tagged with might work better for collecting info - but, again, I don't think that's a great fit here. For example, just about any FAR questions are fair game during an oral exam - and we've got an tag already. Some questions are almost guaranteed to be discussed in the oral, but (particularly for the oral) it would be difficult to draw a line of what does or doesn't belong there.

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