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As an example, I just busted class Bravo airspace, now what?, the accepted answer includes several US specific details (FAA, AOPA, ASRS). However, the question was not US specific.

I expect this will become a bigger issue as we get more questions dealing with regulatory issues. If we do not have some sort of mechanism to specify which set of regulations a question is referring to, we will end up with questions which have multiple "correct" answers.

Does anyone have thoughts about how we should be handling country specific details? or if any special action is even required?

edit: Another possible US specific answer in: Should I log flight time as a passenger?

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We should create tags for major aviation regulatory bodies on an as-needed basis. If a user wishes to ask about an issue in regards to a specific country, they should mention it in their question and tag it as such.

If a question is not tagged, doesn't have a specific country or governing body mentioned, and the answer clearly depends on the local operating rules, we should use comments to ask for clarification and/or do our best to keep their responses as country-neutral as possible.

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    $\begingroup$ Comments can also be used pretty easily for clarification purposes (it is their stated purpose after all), but the community could definitely encourage/enforce that regulations-based questions use an appropriate tag (i.e. faa, easa, icao, etc). $\endgroup$ – Bret Copeland Dec 17 '13 at 23:20
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In many questions the applicable legislation will play a mayor role. I suggest to create tags representing the appropriate authorities. In the USA, that will be mostly the FAA, for Europe it will be mostly EASA.

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I think that a lot of questions will not have very region-neutral answers, especially those that relate to regulations. As long as the answer calls out the regulatory body that it's using, or cites that country's regs, it seems like that could be sufficient.

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    $\begingroup$ But should a user asking a question specify a region? otherwise, it seems a question could have multiple "correct" answers. $\endgroup$ – kyryx Dec 17 '13 at 23:03
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    $\begingroup$ Hmm, true. If the question is regulatory, it should probably include the country. $\endgroup$ – egid Dec 17 '13 at 23:05
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    $\begingroup$ @kyryx: What's wrong with having multiple correct answers? Even though only one may benefit to whoever posted the question, I think there is merit for future visitors in having a collection of equally valid answers that cover different scenarios and regions, as long as the question is specific enough not to inspire seperate answers for every country on the globe. $\endgroup$ – Marcks Thomas Dec 18 '13 at 1:23
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    $\begingroup$ I think that it makes it hard to accept answers, and potentially hard for readers to differentiate when reading similar answers related to different countries. $\endgroup$ – egid Dec 18 '13 at 1:55
  • $\begingroup$ @MarcksThomas egid is correct, it's a stack exchange policy as far as I'm aware. The whole format of the site is setup for questions which have a single answer, which is why answers are accepted. The format is really designed for giving definitive answers. $\endgroup$ – kyryx Dec 18 '13 at 5:45
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    $\begingroup$ @kyryx: I disagree. An answer is marked accepted by a single person, indicating which was most useful to him. The rest of the community uses upvotes and downvotes, a system that certainly allows for multiple correct answers. The policy I suspect you are referring to is not meant to exclude questions that can have multiple right answers, but to exclude questions that can have none, e.g. because they are primarily opinion-based. $\endgroup$ – Marcks Thomas Dec 18 '13 at 11:14
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    $\begingroup$ Well one of the close reasons contains in the description "There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format.". I'd think a few possible answers are okay, but once we start to get into 5 or more that's way too much. $\endgroup$ – Qantas 94 Heavy Dec 18 '13 at 13:18

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