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There are votes to close this question, about reconstructing the flight path of a UAV from aircraft pitch, roll, yaw data. This is a question about flight dynamics, as covered in this wiki article. It is suggested to port the question to physics or mathematics, while the question is very clearly about aircraft.

Aerodynamics is a field of physics appliccable to aviation. So are flight dynamics. Why are questions about flight dynamics considered off topic?

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I would argue that it is on topic. Flight dynamics is an important part of aviation, even if it is more "mathy" than most people want to read about or consider answering. I do think it is fair that the mathematics.se group was mentioned. If unfamiliar with the field it is very foreign material. As an aerospace engineer, I love seeing those questions, just like any of the aerodynamics ones.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes if unfamiliar with the field then it can't be aviation, right. I'm personally very cautious with proposing to close questions that I know little about, and often surprised by the quality of the answers on questions that seem mediocre at first glance. Seems to be exactly what this site is intended for. $\endgroup$ – Koyovis Aug 17 '17 at 8:39
  • $\begingroup$ @Koyovis I don't think your first statement is correct. There are tons of aviation topics and no one person, at least not me, is familiar with all of them. To say that something unfamiliar can't be aviation isn't fitting for an aviation community based on asking questions and sharing information. I do love seeing those detailed answers on all sorts of topics. It amazes me too that people know so much! What always get me are the Aircraft-Identification questions, specifically when they identify something accurately from seemingly nothing! $\endgroup$ – ryanrr Aug 17 '17 at 15:25
  • $\begingroup$ We're in total agreement here. $\endgroup$ – Koyovis Aug 18 '17 at 1:52
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Seems on-topic to me. Way over my head, but on-topic.

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