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A new user asked this question, which is essentially how a bigger airplane can recover from a spin?

Right now, it has already 4 close votes.

If I recall correctly, there have been questions which are very less likely to happen (not exactly hypothetical) and yet were good enough to survive. Does this one fit that category or not?

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There's nothing wrong with hypothetical questions as such, e.g. "Will my piston engine keep running if I have total electrical failure?" is a hypothetical question but it's clear and has a definite, useful answer.

The hypothetical questions that cause more problems are ones like this. It's very broad, makes a lot of assumptions and is really a 'movie plot' scenario. I think those are the ones where we should close the question, suggest a discussion in chat, or at least push for a much more specific question.

As for the airliner spin question you're referring to, I think it's really a dupe of this one, or at least it would be if the OP had some more background knowledge about flight. But of course that's the entire point of asking the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Yes, indeed it is an exact duplicate. I was only talking about hypothetical questions and used the one I mentioned as an example. $\endgroup$
    – Farhan Mod
    Dec 24 '14 at 18:21
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This particular question is not only hypothetical, it is very vague. We have had other questions that described clearly what the cause of the hypothetical situation was. In this case the cause is "due to some technical snag" which makes it impossible to answer the question. If, for example, the "technical snag" is a persistent rudder hardover, the answer would be different than for a temporary autopilot malfunction.

The problem is that the question is unclear if you want to give a specific answer or too broad if you want to deal with all possible situations.

Hence I voted to close.

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  • $\begingroup$ I agree that that particular question was vague. That's why I rephrased what that user would have asked. $\endgroup$
    – Farhan Mod
    Dec 24 '14 at 18:16

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