Hot answers tagged

11

My general feeling is no -- it may certainly be part of an answer ("blah blah blah blah blah, but you should call your local FSDO as their interpretation is ultimately the one that will matter."), but it isn't something that can really stand on its own. I think a question that can ONLY be answered by calling your local FSDO is probably not a quality ...


10

If we were writing academic papers, then quoting a fact you learned without citing its source would be plagiarism, regardless of how you phrase it. On Stack Exchange, plagiarism just means copying. You can't copyright facts, so you can mention a fact wherever you got it from (though obviously nobody should believe you if you don't justify it). Your exhibit ...


8

I checked MSE, and found two posts related to this issue, from which: If someone leaves an identical answer on an old question (for some arbitrary definition of "old"), cast a deletion vote or flag with a custom explanation, and ask for deletion. (link) and Every additional answer adds noise. The presence of many similar answers essentially all ...


8

Since the order of answers is not fixed, responding directly to another answer in your own answer can get a little confusing. I'd much rather see a statement along the lines of "A common misconception is that...but..." and keep it generic and self-contained than referring to another specific answer. If you do feel the need to comment on a specific answer, ...


7

Interesting question. My opinion is that we're here to answer questions correctly and I can see some problems with leaving incorrect answers there: They're a distraction from the correct answers; they take up space on the page and it may not be immediately obviously to readers - especially less informed ones - that they're wrong Where do you put the 'meta-...


7

Well, serial downvoting for revenge is clearly a violation of terms of service. That's a situation for mods to handle. A factual error is a definite reason for a downvote. That's what makes good answers float to the top and poor answers sink to the bottom. If there's disagreement between you and the op, that's why each person only gets one vote. If others ...


7

I don't think it's appropriate to make large modifications. The Help Center says: Some common reasons to edit are: to fix grammatical or spelling mistakes to clarify the meaning of a post without changing it to correct minor mistakes or add addendums / updates as the post ages to add related resources or hyperlinks Nothing about a ...


6

Delete. I agree that answers can't be considered in isolation. The only answer on a question, if not incorrect and not useless, should generally be kept upon meeting minimal criteria. In contrast, on a "hot question", many answers that would in isolation not even raise a flag, may well contain nothing that hasn't been covered already. SE is not a platform ...


6

I've drafted up an example. Question: Is traveling on first class safer? ✔ Scenario 1: Answer 1: Yes, because... Answer 2: Somewhat, because... ❌ Scenario 2: Answer 1: Yes, because reason 1 Answer 2: Yes, because reason 2 If you have different opinions of a single subject, you can write them in two answers. But if you have multiple reasons supporting ...


6

Not unless it is the only thing that is appropriate for the answer, but there are only a few questions that I can think of where that would be true, like: How do I get an appointment with the FAA to get ...? How do I get a letter of authorization for ...? How do I contact someone at the FAA? In the particular case that you linked to, I think that a ...


6

This answer has been dramatically edited. See the edit history for context. Required standards of evidence for answers should be defined locally (in the question) rather than globally (site-wide). Rationale: 1. Not all questions can be answered to an arbitrarily high standard of evidence. Some questions have verifiable, authoritative answers. Some do not. ...


5

Acronyms are part of any field, and anyone interested in learning about the field should also start learning the language. To help with that learning, I think explaining acronyms is generally a good idea. Even in technical papers they generally define them the first time they are mentioned and include an acronym section. If the question is clearly a more ...


5

I've done it a lot, I think (self-answering, not lack of research). So I have examples I can show: Where are the circuit breakers on the 787? A question I asked myself, and was able to answer before posting, so I posted the answer right away because I thought it was interesting. So if the body lacks research, post the answer right away (the answer then is ...


4

I don't agree that this answer, or others like it, are informative. In the context of the question (and answers are always in the context of the question), it is actively misleading. If you think it contains facts that would be meaningful in the context of a different question, then ask that question and offer it as an answer, but it should be removed from ...


4

I believe that answers like the one in your example are going to be inevitably downvoted and deleted. This is what typically happens to answers that are not accurate or do not answer the question. If such a post happens to touch on a point that would be useful to discuss, then it needs to find a place in an answer. Ideally, the person originally posting the ...


4

Being a "Big Nerd (tm)", I have downloaded the csv files from the data anlytics. I have selected the period 1st Jan 2014 (1 week after public beta status) till yesterday, 9th Sep 2015. I have selected the "weekly average" option. I then plotted the ratio of questions over accepted answers: Taking daily data does not show anything particular to me: As ...


4

If it is not public and/or based on publicly available information, it means that is basically opinion-based, and as such is off-topic in my opinion. The alternative is to have a question that will not be answered until such information becomes public (if it ever will happen) but invites speculation in the meanwhile.


4

Simply put, the level of evidence required is equal to the evidence desired by the community. Generally speaking, we expect answers to be defensible. So if you write something which strikes a user as wrong or improbable, they may ask you for a citation. If your response is something like "I heard it from a guy on [random forum]" then that's not going to ...


4

The ultimate design goals of the site are still constrained by its Stack Overflow heritage: It's a system designed to answer the current questions being asked, and floating old questions back to the front page regularly tends to interfere with that. Popularity inherently falls off as questions age, and even our best early questions are unfortunately in the "...


3

Here is the scenario you've presented. User 1 answered a question User 2 found a possible duplicate User 1 agreed that it is a duplicate Is User 1 misusing the system? TL;DR No, they are not misusing the system. Regarding the first point, User 1 is not required to search for duplicates before answering. (Is it my responsibility to search for duplicates &...


2

Why aren't people trying to answer my questions? Because this site actively discourages trying. Either a person knows the answer, and posts it, or doesn't, and no answer is posted. You are probably asking questions that not so many people know the answer to, and thus it is more difficult for an answer to be posted.


2

I'm clearly for your option A. Downvoting without explanation is rude in my eyes and only justified if the answer is of obviously poor quality. Most answers are the best effort of the person and it is a question of respect and politeness to point out why you see a downvote as a justified response. Indeed, I avoid down voting and prefer to point out the ...


2

I feel like a downvote is a little harsh for a first response. We all make mistakes, I'll try to leave a comment if something in the answer seems wrong. Especially for new users, it might be a bit off-putting to have their first answers downvoted right away. Even if I also leave a comment, a downvote may make someone read a comment more harshly than intended....


2

By comparing questions on Meta to questions on the main site you are comparing Apples and Zebras: On Meta, particularly in discussion questions, a diversity of opinions is a Good Thing. This is a site for discussing the Aviation Stack Exchange community and experience. Folks will have different opinions on how the site should function, what sort of ...


2

Your suggestion is absolutely right, I think we would need to have more conversation about how to better encourage this. Our regular users seem to already understand this. As you've pointed out, the system is set up to encourage self-answers, and there are many examples of this being done and received well. Newer users may not be as quick to go this route. ...


1

Personally I think it's a great idea to respond to other answers in your answer, but I'm pretty sure I'm going to be in the minority on this one. Why? Well, the main reason is because often people don't read the comments to see if there are counter arguments to an incorrect answer. Heck, sometimes the system hides comments for us... So putting a specific ...


1

the site analytics says the ratio between question/accept has been roughly constant until recently.


1

If it's a particularly unusual acronym, I might be inclined to add an inline tag, for example: Such and such fams blahdy blah. Hovering on the tag displays the expanded acronym*. Don't forget you can always edit the tag wiki if it doesn't have a good description. * Doesn't work on Meta


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible